EnRoute - Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

Pinot and Pasta: One of our Most Versatile Winter Recipes

by on January 10, 2020

Enroute Pinot and Pasta

“This potato gnocchi has everything I want in a winter recipe. The gnocchi are pillow-y yet filling. The parmesan cream offers subtle richness, without being over the top. The wild mushroom ragout adds the most delicious earthy flavors to the dish. But the most beautiful thing about this recipe? Its wonderful versatility.

You can skip the cream sauce or omit the ragout and it still tastes dreamy, even more so when paired with a glass of bright, berry inflected EnRoute Pinot Noir “Les Pommiers.”

Need to skip the truffles or swap the homemade gnocchi for your favorite store-bought dumplings? That’s fine. It will still bring out with the generous fruit flavors and soft sage-earth accents of our Russian River Valley Pinot.” – Chef Sarah Walz

 

One final chef’s note: Preparing and freezing the gnocchi ahead of time is encouraged for two reasons: it will significantly help you with your prep timing, and sautéed gnocchi adds a delightful “toothiness” to the texture of the potato pasta.

Gnocchi with Mushroom Ragout and Parmesan Cream

Serves 4

Gnocchi Ingredients

2 cups rock salt, for baking

1,000 grams Russet potatoes (roughly 4 medium-to-large potatoes)

1 egg

1 egg yolk

250 grams of flour (2cups)

1-2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon ground white pepper

 

2 tablespoons olive oil

Optional: 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg and one tablespoon chopped chives

 

Mushroom Ragout Ingredients

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 cup onions, diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 pound mixed mushrooms (hedgehogs, porcini, chanterelles), chopped to bite-sized pieces

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Fresh thyme sprigs

 

Parmesan Cream Sauce Ingredients

1 cup Chardonnay

1 shallot, sliced thin

2 thyme sprigs

1 quart heavy cream

1 1/2 cups grated parmesan

Optional: dash of nutmeg, for seasoning

 

Method

For the gnocchi:

First, wrap a full-sized sheet pan in plastic wrap and spay with non-stick cooking spray.

Bake potatoes on a bed of rock salt until soft. Remove and discard skins, then use a ricer to rice potato into a medium-sized bowl. Season with salt and fresh ground white pepper (an additional eighth of a teaspoon nutmeg and one tablespoon chopped chives optional), then add two tablespoons olive oil and the egg and egg yolk. As you add ingredients and begin to form your dough, be careful not to overwork it.

Sprinkle flour onto potato mixture, using your hands or a wooden spoon to mix until a sticky dough forms in the bowl. Then sprinkle a generous dusting of flour onto a clean work surface, place your potato gnocchi dough down and form a circular, flat ball. Cut one quarter of the dough and form it into a long snake. Slice one 1-inch piece and drop it into a small pot of boiling water. If the gnocchi falls apart, work two more tablespoons of flour into the dough.

Test two to three additional pieces until the dough stays together. Then, let your dough rest for 20 minutes, covered. Your dough should be below room temperature, and rather cool. Form gnocchi and place on sheet pan. When you’ve formed all your gnocchi, cook in salted boiling water. When the gnocchi rise to the top, remove with a slotted spoon. If you are serving right away, place cooked gnocchi in a shallow dish and toss with olive oil to keep them from sticking.

If you are preparing them in advance, remove the gnocchi and place in a large ice water bath to prevent them from continuing to cook. Spread them out on your sheet pan and place in freezer. When you are ready to serve, heat a large sauté pan on high heat, add two tablespoons vegetable oil and then add enough frozen gnocchi to cover – but not exceed – the bottom of the pan. (yes, it’s easier to sear the gnocchi’s from frozen). Each should have space to wiggle. Sauté until golden on all sides, season with salt and pepper and remove to serving dish.

 

 

For the mushroom ragout:

Heat olive oil in large skillet on medium-high heat. When the oil is almost smoking, add onions and garlic, lower temperature to medium-low and cook until the onions have wilted, roughly three minutes. Add mushrooms, season with salt and pepper, and sauté until the mushrooms are tender and all the liquid has evaporated.

 

 

For the parmesan cream sauce:

In a saucepan add Chardonnay, sliced shallot, and thyme sprigs and turn heat to high. Reduce until wine is al sec or has a syrup-like constancy. Watch it closely as it can quickly go from a syrup to a burnt mess if you’re not attentive. Add heavy cream and bring to a simmer. Cook for two minutes on medium-high heat.  When the cream has reduced by a quarter, strain the shallots and thyme sprigs and pour cream into a blender.  Blend on low and slowly add grated cheese until combined. Season with salt and white pepper (a dash of nutmeg is optional).

 

To serve:

Easily served family-style or in individual bowls, top your gnocchi with warm parmesan cream, followed by the mushroom ragout. If you’re feeling decadent, shave white truffles over each dish, pour a glass of EnRoute Pinot Noir “Les Pommiers,” and curl up by the fireplace with good company. Salut!

 

 

 

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Swoon-worthy Cornish Hen

by on November 26, 2019

EnRoute Russian River Pinot Noir

From the lemon-tarragon brine to the white beans with bacon lardons and butternut squash, we are swooning over this Cornish hen recipe from our winery kitchens. Pull the cork on our Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, EnRoute “Les Pommiers,” early, as you’ll both cook with it and pair it with this fragrant autumn feast. The bright berry-cherry flavors and spice accents are an ideal match for the hen’s tender meat and herb-y notes, while vibrant acidity cuts through the fat in the crisp skin. It’s truly swoon-worthy. Cook it once and you’ll see what we mean.

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A Mushroom, Pork and Pinot Menu You’ll Be Wild About!

by on February 19, 2019

EnRoute Russian River Pinot Noir

Get ready to go wild for this mushroom, pork and Pinot Noir menu from our winery kitchen. The quintessential pairing here is the pork tenderloin and our flagship Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, EnRoute “Les Pommiers,” but the wild mushrooms (foraged or store-bought) take it to heavenly levels!

“It’s a mushroom forager’s favorite time of year here in Northern California. Although I’ve long enjoyed harvesting my own mushrooms, I recently had the pleasure of going on my first professionally guided wild mushroom hunt. It was rainy and cold as we trekked out to coastal Jenner, but the soggy day spent digging in the dirt rewarded us with a roasted mushroom feast that evening. That impromptu supper inspired the roasted mushroom and pork recipe below. It’s woodsy, meaty and fantastic with our EnRoute Pinot Noir, “Les Pommiers.” I’m excited to share it with you!”  – Executive Chef Sarah Walz

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A Super Versatile Salmon and Pinot Noir Menu!

by on August 29, 2018

 

“It’s wild king salmon season in the San Francisco Bay Area! The season usually starts in May and runs through October, and I love using the fresh catches for dinners here at the winery. We served this Cedar Plank Roasted Salmon during a private event just last week, pairing it with wilted kale and fresh cranberry beans (I’m a little obsessed with beans right now).

The kale is really jamming in our garden and tomatoes are hitting their peak, so the menu was 100% seasonal and garden-inspired. We served our EnRoute Pinot Noir, “Les Pommiers,” alongside it. The wine’s bright acidity balanced the salmon’s natural oiliness, while its generous red fruit flavors brought out the richness of the fish.”

Far Niente Family of Wineries Chef Sarah Walz

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From the EnRoute Kitchen: A Favorite Russian River Wine and Food Pairing

by on February 27, 2018

 

As we slowly transition into spring, we invite you to warm up the last nights of winter with one of our favorite Russian River wine and food pairings: Roasted Duck Breast with Agrodolce and our flagship EnRoute Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, “Les Pommiers.”

Our winery chef, Sarah Walz, loves the subtly sweet yet sour flavor profile that a sauce agrodolce lends rich, tender meats like duck breast. For this particular recipe, we turn to saba, a grape-based syrup that can best be described as akin to balsamic but softer, rounder and less acidic. If you can’t find a high-quality saba near you,  Balsamic Reserve can serve as a palate-pleasing substitute.

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